Myths of modern individualism : Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Robinson Crusoe (Record no. 31495)

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008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
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020 ## - INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER
International Standard Book Number 9780521585644
082 ## - DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION NUMBER
Classification number 809.93353
Item number WAT
100 ## - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Watt, Ian P.
245 ## - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Myths of modern individualism : Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Robinson Crusoe
260 ## - PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC. (IMPRINT)
Name of publisher, distributor, etc Cambridge University Press,
Date of publication, distribution, etc 1996
Place of publication, distribution, etc Cambridge :
300 ## - PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Extent xvi, 293 p. ;
Dimensions 22 cm
365 ## - TRADE PRICE
Price amount 29.99
Price type code GBP
Unit of pricing 105.70
490 ## - SERIES STATEMENT
Series statement Canto
504 ## - BIBLIOGRAPHY, ETC. NOTE
Bibliography, etc Includes bibliographical references and index.
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc In their original versions, the ultimate fates of Faust, Don Quixote, and Don Juan reflect the anti-individualism of their time: Faust and Don Juan are punished in hellfire, and Don Quixote is mocked. The three represent the positive drive of individualism, which brings down on itself repression by social disapproval. A century later, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe embodies a more favorable consideration of the individual, but only if one refuses to take seriously Defoe's statement that Crusoe's isolation is punishment for disobeying his father. In this volume, Ian Watt examines these four myths of the modern world, all created in the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, as distinctive products of a historically new society. He shows how the original versions of Faust (1587), Don Quixote (1605), and Don Juan (ca. 1620) presented unflattering portrayals of the three, whereas the Romantic period two centuries later re-created them as admirable and even heroic. Robinson Crusoe (1719) is seen as representative of the new religious, economic, and social attitudes. The four figures reveal the problems of individualism in the modern period: solitude, narcissism, and the claims of the self versus the claims of society. None of them marries or has lasting relations with women; rather, each has as his closest friend a male servant. Mephistopheles, Sancho Panza, Catalinon, and Friday are devoted till the end and happy in their subordinate role - the perfect personal servant. This suggests the self-centeredness of the four figures. Each pursues his own view of what he should be, raising strong questions about his character as a hero and also about the society whose ideals he reflects.
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Individualism in literature
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Literature and society
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Literature and morals
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Comparative literature, Themes, motives
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Juan, Don
Topical term or geographic name as entry element History and criticism
942 ## - ADDED ENTRY ELEMENTS (KOHA)
Source of classification or shelving scheme
Item type Books
Holdings
Withdrawn status Lost status Source of classification or shelving scheme Damaged status Not for loan Permanent location Current location Date acquired Cost, normal purchase price Full call number Barcode Date last seen Koha item type
          DAIICT DAIICT 2023-11-09 3169.94 809.93353 WAT 034469 2023-11-09 Books

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